Wall Street Journal

Wall Street Journal Identifies Problems with B12 Deficiency

2 May, 2019

PHOTO: ABBIE TRAYLER-SMITH FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

On Tuesday 30th April, the prestigious Wall Street Journal published an article written by Dana Hawkins-Simons.

Dana is most likely a sufferer of Pernicious Anaemia and, like so many of us, waited years for a diagnosis and treatment. Dana is an award-winning investigative journalist who has lived and worked all over the world and moved to London in September 2018.

Problems

For the article, she contacted the society to be put in touch with the growing number of professional people who are aware of the problems with diagnosing any B12 Deficiency and whether that deficiency is due to Pernicious Anaemia.

The society was happy to help, and Dana attended the conference held in Manchester in early April of this year. There, Dana conducted interviews not only with professionals working in the field but also with patients.

“I had a limited word-count,” she says. “But it’s such a complicated subject that in the end, the Wall Street Journal devoted quite a lot of space to it, which was wonderful.”

There has been a tremendous response to the article. It was the top story on the WSJ’s Facebook page and website on the day it was published, and it received over 150,000 page views in its first two days online.

“The very first day my article ran, I heard from hundreds of people from all over the world who suspect that they, or someone close to them, has B12 deficiency,” says Dana. “It’s clearly a topic of vital importance to many people who are desperate for answers and treatment.”

Getting the article published by the Wall Street Journal will go some way to help us raise awareness amongst health decision makers that there is a need for a thorough overhaul of how Pernicious Anaemia is diagnosed and treated. Our next step will be our Reception at the Welsh Assembly & Government on the 6th June in Cardiff.

The Wall Street Journal link to the article can be found here:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/vitamin-b-12-deficiency-the-serious-health-problem-thats-easy-to-miss-11556589900

13 Comments

  1. Karen Smith

    Great publicity, but is there any way we can access this article without having to subscribe to WSJ? Happy to make s one-off donation.

    Reply
  2. Martin Woodman

    Would be great to be able to read this article but little interest in subscribing to the Wall Street Journal .Any one know how to purchase a back copy in the UK ?

    Reply
  3. Jim Graham

    It seems pointless linking us members to this article when it is protected by a paywall. Is there no way that the Wall Street Journal or the writer can provide free access solely for PAS members? Alternatively, would the writer ‘freely’ produce something similar about her experiences in a separate paper to PAS? Showing goodwill for fellow sufferers?

    Reply
    • Jane Fowler

      Thank you, John!

      Reply
    • Karen Smith

      Thank you, John.

      Reply
    • Lesley Turner

      thank you so much John

      Reply
    • Patricia

      Thanks for this I have pernicious anaemia and I absolutely hate having to get injections as they are sore

      Reply
    • Marilee

      I’m in the U. S. I have pernicious anemia. Looking for a doctor who knows of this. I’m so upset, as I have had this for s few years and have all symptoms plus swollen tongue.
      I’m in Ohio, and really upset.
      Any suggestions on how to find a doctor that us open to your article?

      Reply
      • Donna

        Hi Marilee. Have you gone to see a hematologist. I too am in the United States and was diagnosed by a hematologist. Was life changing.

        Reply
  4. Marilee

    I tried to join with. $100 donation, but it kept saying my age was submitted incorrectly? Can the society help this situation?

    Reply
    • Petra

      Please add the date in the format: dd/mm/yyyy. Thank you!

      Reply
  5. M READER

    I have P A had one year of 3 monthly injections for 1 year. Now they have stopped because I have sufficient B12.

    However, recently been diagnosed with Hyperparathyroidism. Could the two be connected?
    Seeking answers. Thank you.

    Reply

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